U.S. Treaty With The Six Nations (Treaty of Canandaigua), 1794

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1794 Treaty of Canandaigua

U.S. Treaty With The Six Nations, Signed by President George Washington

1794 Treaty of Canandaigua

November is filled with significance for the Oneida Indian Nation. It is the month were we join with the rest of the country honoring our most treasured population -- our veterans. November also has the distinction of being Native American Heritage month.

But with all the celebrations the Oneida, along with other members of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, pause to note the significance of the signing of the Treaty of Canandaigua 220 years ago.

It was in this treaty where one of the paramount issues addressed was that the United States acknowledged the lands reserved to the Oneidas and others in the confederacy. Within the lines of this treaty the United States and Oneida Nation agree to their boundaries and commit never to interfere with each other’s land:

The one promise the Oneidas received from the federal government was through the Nov. 11, 1794 Treaty of Canandaigua, which was signed between the United States and some nations of Haudenosaunee Confederacy. One of the paramount issues addressed by the treaty was that the United States acknowledged the lands reserved to the Oneidas and others in the confederacy. Within the lines of this treaty the United States and Oneida Nation agree to their boundaries and commit never to interfere with each other’s land:

“The United States acknowledges the lands reserved to the Oneida… to be their property; and the United States will never claim the same, nor their Indian friends residing thereon and united with them, in the free use and enjoyment thereof …”

Full text version of the Treaty of Canandaigua

Currently the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in Washington DC is celebrating the Canandaigua Treaty with the exhibit: “Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations.” The largest of its kind, the exhibit -- now open -- has been in development for 10 years.

Nation to Nation is the story of the relationship between the Founding Fathers of the United States and the relationship, history and legacy of U.S.–American Indian diplomacy from the colonial period to present. It will be on display until 2018.

See also:
Nation to Nation NMAI Exhibit

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